The History of Privatization in Brazil and Its Future as Described by Felipe Montoro Jens

Brazil has come a long way in terms of its infrastructural development. Before the advent of privatization of infrastructure in the 20th century, the country was well known for its strong association with the state. However, because of accumulated debt and an under-performing economy, Brazil was forced to change its infrastructural developments towards attaining modernization and boosting the economy.

Felipe Montoro Jens states that the history of privatization of infrastructure can be traced back to the 20th century, particularly in the late 1980s where the concept gained prominence. This period was marked by the state owning businesses and expanding continually.

By April 1990, the National Privatization Program was developed. Privatizations became more common, they were seen as the gateways through which the government could revamp its economic sectors. Some of the industries targeted for industrialization included Petrochemical, aeronautical and steel industries. Soon after, the Concessions law was passed in 1995.

This law allowed the government to name some industries as priority privatizations such as transportation and telecommunications industries. In 2004, the government approved the Public Private Partnerships Act (PPPs) with the telecommunications sector. Soon after, in 2008, the General Concession Plan was established, followed by the plan to universalize the Country’s Fixed Telephone service in 2011.

Felipe Montoro Jens is a man of many qualities among them being leadership and management. He has held executive positions at several companies including AC Energia SA and Concesionaria Travase Olmos. He is also a principal professional in companies like H2olmos and Maranon Energia SA. He is also a director at Foz do Brasil SA and San Antonio Energia SA.

Felipe Montoro holds an undergraduate degree from the Getulio Vargus Foundation in Brazil and a Bachelor’s degree on International management from the prestigious Thunderbird school of Global Management. He was also among the speakers during the 2011 world economic forum about Latin America which focused on investment in infrastructural projects.