Susan McGalla: Changing How We See Gender in the Business World

Susan McGalla is changing the way that women are being seen in leadership roles. A recent article, “How Pittsburgh’s Susan McGalla Paved the Way for Women in Leadership” published on Phillypurge.com talks about how women in these roles, like McGalla, are creating change in the business world. With these women occupying more powerful roles, they are poised to help the next generation of female leaders come into their own if they are provided with the right program structure.

A major barrier to gender diversity in C-level positions of S&P 500 companies is that female leadership initiatives are lacking. Often aimed at identifying barriers and working towards fixing them, these programs are missing a key component that would make them more effective. This component is a good mentorship program with competent executives. In fact, McGalla points out that when she started in the business world, she stopped thinking about the barriers that might exist for her and she began to act. While that is admirable, there are a lot of female candidates that are still working to forge their own path and gain skills. Strong leaders like McGalla can provide exceptional leadership for individuals that are struggling to break into the superior ranks of the business world.

McGalla, herself, is a formidable woman. After graduating from college with a B.A. in Marketing and Business, she set out to prove her merit. She worked in several positions, culminating in her appointment to President of American Eagle Outfitters. McGalla was a strong and confident leader, helping to grow the company by overseeing the launch of several new brands.

Ultimately McGalla decided to launch her own company, P3 Executive Consulting. In this role, she continues to be a consultant for individuals at the top of the financial industry. McGalla believes that in order to advance people need to take the reins of their lives and push forward. She believes that at the end of the day her gender did not factor into her career, she made her superiors see what she brought to the table as a formidable business person first and foremost. Beyond gender, she believes, it is more about how hard you are willing to work.