How The Chainsmokers are Turning the Page

The Chainsmokers have evolved quite a lot since their founding in 2012. Believe it or not, they first found big fame in 2015 when their hit “Roses” claimed its place on the Top 10. Although, most also remember the hit from 2014 entitled “Selfie”. And since then, their fan base has grown exponentially, and they have expanded the field for today’s rising artists. The Chainsmokers music style is a vast and ever changing combination composed of dance, hip-hop, pop, and indie. And to add to all of that they just released a new single this year called “Sick Boy”.

In an interview with Hugh McIntyre they speak of what may have inspired that single, and how it was brought to life. Drew Taggart explains that typically they release more music at sporadic but also constant times because they like to be current with all the compositions that they create. That gives their music more listener value and interest as well. Taggart also goes on to state that he feels “Sick Boy” is the start of a new chapter and that the duo is moving forward and turning the page for something new. He sheds a little light on the meaning of “Sick Boy” and the darkness within it.

Taggart then says, “The next topic is a little bit darker, but I think that’s the tone of society right now. Our stuff is always a reflection of what’s going on in our lives and the world around us.”

Taggart also begins to explain that he also wrote the song because he was becoming frustrated, and that he is angry because he feels that he has become a distortion of his true self. Then he states that this is in part because of the current world. Society encapsulates themselves in social media and anyone at any given time that shares bits of information can be misunderstood and misinterpreted. The darkness of “Sick Boy” is a representation of those with assuming minds and also a depiction of what’s bad around the world today.

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Heavy Metal with Cassio Audi

Looking back on the decades there have been various types of musical genres and it seems like they are ever changing. Bands like Nirvana and Van Halen easily come to mind when one thinks of heavy metal in it’s early stages. Another band that is left at the back of people’s minds is Viper. Read more about Cassio Audi at 12social.com.br.

This band overcame many challenging obstacles throughout the years but its success was anything less than short. The band came together in 1985 when a group of teenage boys decided to express themselves through heavy metal music. Felipe Machad, Andre Matos, Pit Passarell, Yves Passarell and, Cassio Audi were the young minds responsible for selling out shows in foreign countries like Japan. Cassio Audi was the only drummer the band had from 1985 to 1989 and during this time he helped give Viper creative and unique sounds that launched the band into global limelight. Watch: https://soundhound.com/?ar=200118118817452342

Brazil’s very iconic heavy metal band had flawed English lyrics and simple production but that did not stop it from catching the attention of the world. Audi quickly became well-known for his talent with a set of drumsticks and he is still one of Brazil’s most legendary drummers. The Killera Sword and Soldiers of Sunrise are some of Cassio Audi’s most notable works with Viper. Soldier of Sunrise was the first album that Cassio Audi released as a drummer and regardless of it’s simple production it was the album that sent the world on a frenzy over Viper and it’s strongly talented male drummer. After four immensely successful years with drumsticks in his hands Audi and Viper parted ways. Read more at comhaha.com about Cassio Audi.

Doug Levitt: From Foreign Correspondent To Songwriter And Activist

In an age where singer/songwriters are a dime a dozen, few of these artists manage to have a unique point of view. However, since Doug Levitt has made the career switch from foreign correspondent for major news networks such as NBC and CNN to traveling musician, he has managed to captivate audiences with his journalistic approach to musical storytelling.

 

Levitt grew up as the son of D.C. Councilmember Carol Schwartz and attended the London School of Economics, earning his masters in Nationalism and Ethnic Conflict. From there, he managed to work for prestigious news networks, travelling to countries like Iran and Rwanada. His career as a foreign correspondent was enviable to many, but for Levitt, it felt inauthentic.

 

During a trip back to the United States, Levitt was particularly stricken by the rising poverty statistics as a result of a nationwide economic crisis. Having always felt a certain artistic sense since childhood, Levitt made the decision to abandon his career and engage in a form of activism that would allow him to express his creative side.

 

Levitt teamed up with Americana producer David Henry upon moving to Nashville to launch a singing and songwriting career. It was then that he launched The Greyhound Diaries, a politically-charged multimedia endeavor focusing on musical performance, storytelling and photography.

 

The name for the project comes from the 100,000 miles he has traveled on Greyhound buses. During these travels, Levitt has seen American poverty firsthand and uses these haunting experiences to fuel his creative process. His work is greatly inspired by WPA initiatives launched during The Great Depression that used art to expose the national economic crisis of the time.

 

Switching careers wasn’t easy for Levitt. For a while, he was broke and busking just to make a little money here and there. His efforts have paid off, however, as his work has been featured in several prestigious venues worldwide. Audiences connect with The Greyhound Diaries thanks to Levitt’s unique artistic voice.

 

Levitt was extremely vocal during this past presidential election, launching a tour to encourage Americans to vote. Currently, he is working on a memoir that chronicles his unique story.